Sabel Harris - Contactually's Director of Content Marketing
7 Crucial Metrics to Measure for Follow-Ups

7 Crucial Metrics to Measure for Follow-Ups

When you send an email you are probably expecting a response. Sometimes that response comes, and sometimes all you hear are the sounds of crickets. The next proper step that you think of is to follow up. You want the answers to the questions you have. Or maybe you need the answers because they are vital to a business transaction. Maybe it’s not a questioning thing, but maybe the follow-up is vital to your networking skills. You need to stay top of mind with your contacts to grow your business. Don’t worry, you are not alone in this. We know these challenges all too well. You’ve sent dozens of follow-ups for one or both of the reasons above; how do you know if they are working? You’ve gotten a few replies, but some of your follow-ups are still hanging out in the ether of the dark email universe. Are you sending out follow-ups blindly? Or are you measuring the performance of your follow-ups? What are the metrics you need to keep tabs on so that your follow-ups get answered? Over the past year our users have sent millions of follow-ups out of Contactually and here are the top 7 metrics to measure for your follow-up performance. What you start measuring for your follow-ups… 1. # of Follow-Ups Sent How many follow-ups have you sent in the day or week? How many did you send before you got a response? Knowing the just how many follow-ups you have sent is important to your overall communication strategy. You’ll be able to see how many emails you are sending out in response to previous correspondence....
Why You Need to Keep Networking During Busy Season

Why You Need to Keep Networking During Busy Season

Busy Season for real estate is between the the months of March to July. In these months, home searching and buying is at it’s peak. Trulia published a report studying home online searches that mirrored just that showing that in many states people are searching to buy new or more properties during this time. As a real estate agent, you probably have your hands full. Your calendar is booked, you have ongoing emails going out to your buyers and sellers, and you’re going from open house to open house. There isn’t a lot of time. for networking or building new relationships. But, we’re here to tell you to get out of that mindset. Did you know that people who are looking to buy a house are beginning their search 6 to 12 months before? Imagine if your potential leads were searching for a home during the previous busy season. Did you reach out? Or were you too busy? There are many variables to this; however, the average real estate agent sells about 3 houses a year. You’re not average, right? (Or at least you don’t want to be) If most real estate agents are focused on things outside of relationship building and networking, this is your chance to stand out and to stack your odds that you come out on top. Keep networking during real estate busy season… We understand that it becomes difficult to juggle multiple tasks, but we also want you to know how important your network is to your business. Between listing a home and finding the perfect house for your client, you’re probably wondering when you’ll find...
5 Ways on How to Make an Introduction the Dale Carnegie Way

5 Ways on How to Make an Introduction the Dale Carnegie Way

How to Win Friends and Influence People was written for almost any situation with human interactions. Dale Carnegie, although many of his examples were during his time, was a man that spoke of things that will resonate beyond when he wrote this timeless book. In regards to building relationships and networking, Carnegie presents a plethora of insights to do your best in both. We’ve written about how to write emails that influence a buyer’s decision (the Dale Carnegie Way), yet how do you even start the email chain? What do you do when you don’t even know the person? Yes, you can send a cold email, but what if you knew someone who could introduce you? Or what if it was the other way around? How do you write an awesome introduction…the Dale Carnegie way? How to Make an Introduction the Dale Carnegie Way… 1. Names are a Valuable Key “Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sounds in any language.” Remembering names is sometimes difficult, but as preached by Carnegie, recalling someone’s name can have great positive returns. When you hear your name, your brain activates the posterior region. The posterior region in your brain involves planned movements, spatial reasoning, and attention. I think it’s a safe and somewhat educated assumption that it’s similar process and activation in your brain when you read your name. And it’s attention grabbing, you’ll have someone’s focus by using their name. Introducing someone with the right name online shouldn’t be hard, but you’d be surprised how many people make that mistake. Whether it’s through autocorrect,...
Psychology Sunday: Forming Habits

Psychology Sunday: Forming Habits

A habit is a “settled regular tendency or practice” that happens routinely. There are good habits and bad habits. Probably the ones that stick out in our minds go to the negative, whether it’s biting out nails, smoking, logging on to social media sites all hours of the day, or obsessively checking our phones. As mentioned, there are good habits — flossing every night, exercising every morning, reading, and/or eating a healthy breakfast. Good habits do not only have to do with your physical wellbeing, they can be things you do habitually to help your mentality, your career, or even your overall network. How does a habit even work? How do habits forms? And more importantly, how can you form good habits? A couple of months ago we hosted a webinar on habit formation. In this webinar we focused on the science behind how habits are formed, how. Below, we’ve broken down one of the theories and how it can relate to your network. We’ve also included a helpful worksheet that you can download to practice this yourself. How to start forming habits… The model There are several different models on how habits are formed and different practices you can put into place. For example, their is BJ Fogg’s tiny habits, approaches in Carrots and Sticks, and methods in Nir Eyal’s book Hooked. The one we’re focusing on that we believe encompasses those and more is from Charles Duhigg’s book The Power of Habit. Duhigg in his book talks about the Habit loop, which you can see below. Each habit has different components in the loop and Duhigg breaks down...
How to Export Linkedin Contacts Out of Linkedin

How to Export Linkedin Contacts Out of Linkedin

With LinkedIn and Facebook shutting down their API, many software solutions haven’t been able to fully sync data from LinkedIn and Facebook. In relation to your network, we understand your contact base goes beyond your email, which is why the API shutdown affected the update of your contact database. Although, we’ve felt the effects of the API shutdown and gone through some alternative solutions to get our users the data they need, in this blog post we found a very easy way to get your contacts out of LinkedIn. There are some workarounds to get your contact information from your friends on Facebook, but your professional network — LinkedIn — how do you get the contact information out that network? This process is a little easier than Facebook, but it’s more controlled by LinkedIn. Check out below how to export LinkedIn contacts out of LinkedIn… Login to your LinkedIn account. Scroll over your profile picture and under that drop down click the second to last option “Privacy & Settings” Scroll down “Basics” and click the last option “Getting an archive of your data.” After clicking on “Getting an archive of your data,” you’ll be able to download the info you need. Click the blue download button. Once you’ve clicked the download button, you’ll see a response that says your data is being prepared for download and your request is pending. You’ll receive an email with your “first installment” with a file that contains messages, connections, and imported contacts. Look out in your inbox (the email that you used to sign up with your LinkedIn account) for this file. You should...